Staff Report

New Delhi, India— As the Naz Foundation had done four years ago, they found themselves back in front of India’s High Court over the same issue: Is homosexuality legal or not?

Like a surprising tsunami, the Delhi Court reversed its own 2009 decision on Section 377, a law that had been on India’s books since the days of British colonization and refers to criminalizing “carnal intercourse against the order of nature”, clearly indicating a shift in India’s government toward embracing antique British protocols, and allowing Christian, Muslim and Hindu religions to dictate Indian laws and civil rights in much the same way the British did prior to 1947, when the British perceived the Muslims, Buddhists, and Hindus to be little more than children that needed to be cared for.

Now the Indian judicial system has decided to treat the millions of homosexuals in its borders like children and “whack their pee-pee’s” if they stuck them anywhere except where they decided they belonged.

Amnesty International called the Delhi Court’s decision “a body blow to people’s rights to equality, privacy and dignity.”

OrinAm, an organization of mental health professionals, lawyers and activists, made the following statement: “The judgment of the Supreme Court is an unconscionable blow to the dignity of LGBT persons who as per the Indian Constitution are entitled to equal treatment.”

After seeing the burgeoning LGBT movement in India over the past four years, it’s LGBT-Today’s opinion that this decision will not go over easy with the new crop of activists we’ve observed through the internet, and fully expect to see contentious protests against the government until the Parliament of India grows enough balls to take Section 377 out of its laws once and for all.

It’s fairly odd that a national Supreme Court that meets in a pink dome should make an anti-gay law decision.

LGBT-Today News Magazine

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